Cat cafés in Japan

Article by Brian Ashcraft from Kotaku

Japan has loads of cat cafes. Loads. Many of them look the same—like coffee shops with cats or, even, like somebody’s apartment with, well, cats.

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For many Tokyoites, an evening after work spent in a “neko cafe” (cat cafe) sounds purrfect. The metropolis is home to several dozen of these cafes, which charge patrons by the hour to play with cats.

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For regulars, the cafes offer a place to unwind and play with cats, while they sip coffee. Many urban apartments do not permit pets, meaning that pet lovers are left without furry friends to call their own. The neko cafes fill that void.

Pet lovers often describe the joy their animals give them. Those living in environments that do not permit pets yearn for that interaction.

“It’s a great place, it calms the stresses of working life,” Ayumi Sekigushi, 23, told Reuters about her favorite cat cafe.

An example of cat café is Temari no Ouchi which looks like something out of a Studio Ghibli anime.

Located in Tokyo’s Kichijoji, the cafe opened last year. There’s a 1,200 yen ($11.81) entrance fee on weekdays and a 1,500 yen ($14.80) one on weekends and holidays. Once inside, there is an array of foods and beverages that can be ordered (of course, for additional fees).

What’s neat about this cafe is that it really looks like it was influenced by Studio Ghibli anime. There’s space for the cats to wander about and play, as well as explore and relax, which, as these types of cafes go, seems to be good for the animals.

Below you can see photos of Temari no Ouchi via websites AsItShouldBe, Buu Buu no Blog and the cafe’s official Facebook page (all the images are from the cafe’s Facebook except where noted):

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Japan – Dining alone without dining alone

Photos and article by CNN

(CNN) — Talk about creative coping mechanisms for being alone —
To save its lone customers from the awkward perils of solo dining, the Moomins House cafe kindly seats diners with stuffed animal companions called Moomins, a family of white hippo-like characters created by Finnish illustrator and writer Tove Jansson.

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Moomins are brought to each table so that patrons — solo or in groups — can have a turn sitting with them.

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Moomintroll (L) and his girlfriend the Snork Maiden hope for a double date.

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Weekday mornings are the quietest time, while weekends are packed all day long.

While there are three Moomin Cafe locations in Japan, the Tokyo Dome cafe is popular with Dome concert goers.

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Moomin House Cafe features bread made from Finnish rye and food in the shape of Moomin characters, such as Hattifattener cookies (pictured).

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This year marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of Moomins creator, Tove Jansson, who was born in 1914 and died in 2001.

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Tokyo’s power-nap cafés

Japanese are known to work at least 12 hours a day. And each year, about 150 of them die from overwork – a situation known as karoshi.

Recent trend in Japan is to have a power nap ( known as inemuri) during the work day. Cafés in Tokyo are offering “nap” services for as little as 10 mins to as long as four hours or more. These ” third spaces” ( i.e. neither work nor home) provide rest, privacy and of course, food and drinks.

The latest café in Tokyo is called Qusca : a women’s only sleeping café located in business district Akasaka. It allows women to catch forty winks during their lunch break or in between yet another few hours of overtime, at a cost of only ¥150 (about $1.60) per ten minutes, or ¥3,120 (just over $33) for a four-hour slot.

In this way it will no doubt appeal to women with only thirty minutes at lunch to spare — or who are between appointments for a few hours and want to relax.

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Men or women can also go to Mahika Mano – a Hammock Café and Gallery showroom where you are invited to lay down for a nap—within a time limit.

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At foot & body care zzz, a nap and a professional massage at the same time can be provided

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Some spas are also offering futons or reclining chairs for your post-spa nap, such as this one below.

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Adapted from Japan Trends website

Adapted from Rocket News website